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Original research (Published On: 21-May-2024)

Prevalence of parasitic helminthes of veterinary and zoonotic importance among cattle, sheep and goats slaughtered in Sabon – Tasha Abattoir, Chikun LGA, Kaduna State, Nigeria

EKE SAMUEL SUNDAY

J. Vet. Res. Adv., 06 (01):20-27

EKE SAMUEL SUNDAY: BIOLOGY UNIT, AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, KADUNA, NIGERIA

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Article History: Received on: 03-Oct-23, Accepted on: 11-May-24, Published on: 21-May-24

Corresponding Author: EKE SAMUEL SUNDAY

Email: ekesamuel2012@gmail.com

Citation: Eke SS, Michael NE, Owoh Etete U, Josiah JG, Bello RO, Nnaji CI, Odoh VU, Hussaini FA and Ogunwole AT (2024). Prevalence of parasitic helminthes of veterinary and zoonotic importance among cattle, sheep and goats slaughtered in Sabon – Tasha Abattoir, Chikun LGA, Kaduna State, Nigeria. J. Vet. Res. Adv., 06 (01):20-27


Abstract

Aim: The study was aimed investigate and provide data on the prevalence and zoonotic impact of parasitic helminthes of ruminants slaughtered in Sabon-Tasha Abattoir, Chikun LGA of Kaduna State, Nigeria.

Method and materials:  Faecal samples were collected and examined using direct wet mount and sedimentation methods, respectively. A total of 329 diarrhoeic faecal samples were collected from 117 Cattle, 102 Sheep, and 110 Goats, respectively.

Results: Of the total 329 faecal samples collected and examined, 65.96% were positive for gastrointestinal helminthes parasites. Goats had higher prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites 84.55%, while Cattle and Sheep had a prevalence of 55.56 % and 57.84%, respectively. The difference in the three species of ruminants was statistically significant (p<0.05). Males had the highest infection 58.06% than females as 41.94%. In sheep, young animals were more infected than the adult animals with 54.24% and 45.76% respectively. Also, in goats, adult animals had the highest infection rate of 61.29% than the young animals 38.71%, while in Cattle, adult animals recorded the highest infection rate of 60.0% than the young animals 40.0%. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) on the infection rate in relation to sex and age. Considering the months of study, the overall prevalence of 23.05%, 16.13%, 21.20%, 17.05%, and 22.12% were recorded in the months of July, May, April, August, and June. The differences in infection rates were not statistically significant (p>0.05) even though the prevalence was higher in the month of July.

Conclusion: It was concluded that helminthosis, especially haemonchosis is a threat to small ruminants in the study area. Based on the observations, it has been highlighted the urgent need for the development of epidemiologically-based control strategies for control of helminth parasites of small ruminants in this area.


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